Godfrey, Valentine Thomas Basil

    Nationality:
    British (1801-present, Kingdom)

    Biography

    The Atheltemplar, on which Godfrey Valentine was Chief Engineer, was seriously damaged in the attack mentioned beleow when hit in the bridge by 2 - 500lb bombs.
    After extensive repairs she was finally sunk on September 14th, 1942 by torpedos from U-457 whilst carrying 9400 tons of fuel oil in convoy from Reykavik to North Russia. She had taken part in 17 convoys including suviving the ill-fated convoy HX-84 which was attacked by the German pocket-battleship Admiral Scheer.

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    Period:
    Second World War (1939-1945)
    Rank:
    Chief Engineer
    Unit:
    Merchant Navy (Koopvaardij)
    Awarded on:
    June 10th, 1941
    Action:
    Citation:
    "The ship was hit by bombs and caught fire. The Chief Officer was badly wounded, and all the other Executive Officers were killed. The Chief Engineer took charge of the after starboard lifeboat and got it away with fourteen of the ship's company, some of whom were wounded. After transferring these to another ship, the Chief Engineer returned with a party to his own vessel. The fire was now out but the steam lines had all gone and there were about two feet of water in the engine-room, covering the dynamos. The Chief Engineer at once made arrangements for towing and the ship was brought into port."
    Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE)
    Period:
    Second World War (1939-1945)
    Rank:
    Chief Engineer
    Unit:
    MV Atheltemplar, Merchant Navy (MV Atheltemplar, Merchant Navy)
    Awarded on:
    June 10th, 1941
    Lloyd's War Medal for Bravery at Sea
    Action:
    Citation:
    "The ship was attacked by enemy aircraft and set on fire. The chief officer was severely wounded, and all the other executive officers were killed. The chief engineer got the starboard boat away with 14 of the crew, some of whom were wounded, and transferred them to the rescuing ship. Returning to his own vessel with another party he found the fire was out, but that all the steam lines had gone, and there were about 2 ft. of water in the engine-room, covering the dynamos. The chief engineer at once arranged for towage and the vessel was brought into port."

    Sources