Davis, George Fleming

    Date of birth:
    March 23rd, 1911 (Manila, Philippine Islands)
    Date of death:
    January 6th, 1945 (Lingayen Gulf, Luzon, Philippine Islands)
    Mentioned on:
    American Cemetery and Memorial Manila
    Service number:
    0-73637
    Nationality:
    American (1776 - present, Republic)

    Biography

    George Davis Fleming was buried at sea.

    Promotions:
    1939: Lieutenant (Junior Grade);
    1941: Lieutenant;
    ?: Lieutenant Commander;
    ?: Commander.

    Career:
    1930 - May 1934: United States Naval Academy;
    ?: Aircraft gunnery observer USS Tuscaloosa (CA-37);
    ?: USS Broome (DD-210);
    ?: USS Hopkins (DD-249);
    1941: USS Oklahoma (BB-37);
    January 1942: Damage Control Officer, USS Honolulu (CL-48);
    November 26th, 1944 - January 6th, 1945: Commanding Officer USS Walke (DD-723).

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    Period:
    Second World War (1939-1945)
    Rank:
    Commander
    Unit:
    U.S.S. Walke (DD-723), U.S. Navy
    Awarded on:
    May 24th, 1945
    Action:
    "For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. WALKE (DD-416), in action against the enemy during important operations in Ormoc Bay, Leyte, Philippine Islands, on 7 December 1944. Commander Davis, during the shore bombardment, neutralization of enemy shore defenses and units by gunfire, and during a prolonged and heavy engagement with enemy aircraft, fought his ship with the highest skill and courage. When the U.S.S. MAHAN was struck by three enemy planes and damaged beyond possibility of salvage, Commander Davis proceeded to the scene, and despite immediate danger from heavy enemy air attacks and the explosion of magazines in the flaming MAHAN, succeeded in rescuing from the water all of the personnel of the U.S.S. MAHAN with the exception of one officer and five men who were evidently lost when the U.S.S. MAHAN was hit. Later while screening the retiring convoy, the U.S.S. WALKE gave an outstanding exhibition of anti-aircraft gunnery against enemy planes attempting to bomb and crash our ships, which aided materially in bringing down at least fourteen planes. The courageous conduct of Commander Davis was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service."
    Details:
    Awarded posthumously.
    Commander 7th Fleet: Serial 03024
    Silver Star Medal (SSM)
    Period:
    Second World War (1939-1945)
    Rank:
    Lieutenant
    Unit:
    U.S.S. Honolulu (CL-48), U.S. Navy
    Awarded on:
    December 5th, 1946
    Legion of Merit - US Military
    Action:
    "For exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services to the Government of the United States as First Lieutenant and Damage Control Officer of the U.S.S. HONOLULU (CL-48) in action against the enemy. He participated in eleven operations and engagements from Kiska to Guam. He was an exceptional officer of the deck and served as such in all actions. By excellent organization, thorough training and indoctrination, his department successfully met every emergency and contributed in large measure to the highly successful accomplishment of his ship. His conduct throughout distinguished him among those performing similar duties."
    Details:
    Awarded posthumously.
    Commander in Chief Pacific: Serial 11432
    Period:
    Second World War (1939-1945)
    Rank:
    Commander
    Unit:
    U.S.S. Walke (DD-723), U.S. Navy
    Action:
    "For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life and beyond the call of duty as Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. Walke engaged in a detached mission in support of minesweeping operations to clear the waters for entry of our heavy surface and amphibious forces preparatory to the invasion of Lingayen Gulf, Luzon, Philippine Islands, 6 January 1945. Operating without gun support of other surface ships when 4 Japanese suicide planes were detected flying low overland to attack simultaneously, Comdr. Davis boldly took his position in the exposed wings of the bridge and directed control to pick up the leading plane and open fire. Alert and fearless as the Walke's deadly fire sent the first target crashing into the water and caught the second as it passed close over the bridge to plunge into the sea of portside, he remained steadfast in the path of the third plane plunging swiftly to crash the after end of the bridge structure. Seriously wounded when the craft struck, drenched with gasoline and immediately enveloped in flames, he conned the Walke in the midst of the wreckage; he rallied his command to heroic efforts; he exhorted his officers and men to save the ship and, still on his feet, saw the barrage from his guns destroy the fourth suicide bomber. With the fires under control and the safety of the ship assured, he consented to be carried below. Succumbing several hours later, Comdr. Davis by his example of valor and his unhesitating self-sacrifice, steeled the fighting spirit of his command into unyielding purpose in completing a vital mission. He gallantly gave his life in the service of his country.
    Details:
    Awarded posthumously, date unknown
    Medal of Honor - Navy/Marine Corps (MoH)

    Sources

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