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  • Article by Pieter Schlebaum
  • Published on June 23rd, 2020

Landings on Juno Beach

June 6, 1944 was a very important date for the liberation of Europe. On this day, the largest amphibious landing in the history of the European continent took place, Operation Overlord, when more than 130,000 British, American, and Canadian troops set foot on French soil in Normandy.

  • Article by Matthias Ouwejan
  • Published on May 29th, 2020

Rise and fall of the Panzerarmee Afrika

North-Africa was a battlefront opened by Adolf Hitler in 1941 after the Italians had suffered a massive defeat in the battle of Beda Fomm against the British, between February 5 and 7, 1941. That battle was the climax of Operation Compass, which the British had launched on December 9, 1940. The Italians were then pushed back to El Agheila and as a result of the massive Allied advance of 497 miles in two months and the losses the Italians suffered, Germany got involved in the battle.

  • Article by Pieter Schlebaum
  • Published on May 3rd, 2020

Landings on Sword Beach

June 6, 1944 was a very important date for the liberation of Europe. On this day, the largest amphibious landing in the history of the European continent took place, Operation Overlord, when more than 130,000 British, American, and Canadian troops set foot on French soil in Normandy. Their task was to break through Hitler’s Atlantic wall. Operation Overlord claimed the life of thousands of young men and the Third Reich never recovered. The tide definitively turned in favor of the allied forces.

  • Article by Kevin Prenger
  • Published on April 5th, 2020

Monuments, Fine Arts and Archives Section

The American Cemetery in Margraten is the last resting place of Captain Walter "Hutch" Huchthausen. Contrary to most other soldiers buried here, Huchthausen did not die while engaged in warfare duties. It was his task to track down objects of artistic and cultural value and to bring them to safety. He belonged to what soldiers among themselves called Monuments Men, a member of the Allied program aimed at protecting Europe's cultural heritage during the war. This article is about these Monuments Men.

  • Article by Peter ter Haar
  • Published on March 30th, 2020

Fliegerhorst Havelte

In May, 1940 the  Luftwaffe took over the captured Dutch airfields. They were soon enlarged in the framework of the war against Great Britain. At first, only two new airfields were constructed: Volkel in North-Brabant and Peest in North-Drenthe near Norg. The last one was ultimately not used due to the ground water of the place. Only in the end of 1942 was construction started of a third new airfield, at Havelte in Southwest-Drenthe.

  • Article by Maarten C. Hoff
  • Published on March 23rd, 2020

Liberation of the northeastern part of the Netherlands

"Food tourists" and "bread thieves", those were daily words in the famine winter of 1944-1945. A large part of the Dutch population was fighting for its life at that time and: "you had to stand in line to be buried," as a manner of speech. To Allied strategists, this was no reason to rearrange their priorities for the destruction of Nazi Germany. In all their plans, the starving nation was literally left at the wayside, the military turning their backs on her.